Major milestone for Dubbo Zoo’s new wildlife hospital

Construction of a new Wildlife Hospital at Taronga Western Plains Zoo has continued to move forward despite the impacts of Covid-19 on the Dubbo region, with the first two of four concrete slabs poured for the main building.

There has been a lot of works completed to date, including clearing the site and earth works prior to the first concrete pour. In-ground services are now commencing and rammed earth walls are being erected for the first aspect of the Wildlife Hospital footprint.

“It’s very exciting to see the Zoo’s Wildlife Hospital starting to take shape,” said Member for the Dubbo electorate Dugald Saunders.

“The NSW Government is very proud to be funding this valuable asset for the Zoo, which will also benefit the wider central west and western regions by providing a wildlife service like no other in regional NSW.

“Once completed the new Wildlife Hospital will be a unique aspect of the zoo experience, allowing guests to see the Zoo’s veterinary team in action and learn about wildlife conservation.”

Over the coming months the additional concrete slab pours for the main building will be completed as well as the erection of the steel building framework and connection of services.

“We’ve had some delays due to the consistent rainfall over the past few months, but work on site is progressing well,” said Taronga Western Plains Zoo Director, Steve Hinks.

“The new Wildlife Hospital will allow us to expand the critical work of our veterinary team in their care for injured and sick wildlife, as well as our conservation and preventative health care programs.”

The construction site is complying with a CovidSafe plan in line with NSW Government regulations and also has a CovidSafe capacity to ensure construction can continue in a safe manner.

The new Wildlife Hospital is due for completion by mid-2022. Construction of the new Wildlife Hospital is funded by the NSW Government. The project is also supported by philanthropic donations to expand the critical work of our veterinary team in their care for injured and sick wildlife, as well as our conservation and preventative health care programs.

Taronga Western Plains Zoo’s Wildlife Hospital has assessed and treated over 700 wildlife cases in the last 12 months. The new purpose-built Wildlife Hospital will also dramatically enhance the Zoo’s capacity and capability to respond to wildlife emergencies such as drought, bushfire and flood, as well as be a valuable teaching institution for veterinary students.

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